Epilogue

Epilogue

 

            The student-teaching process can be summed up in one word, “bittersweet”. At first it seems as if the students who you have worked so hard for making creative lessons will just not give you a chance.  Then through hard work and dedication to getting to know the students in your class and you finally feel alive within the classroom it’s over with.  I knew that teaching was an emotional career due to past relationships with teachers I had.  However, there is no word to describe how you feel as an educator once you have built the rapport with the students and they finally “get” what is being taught.  I struggled the first month trying to quickly relate to my students because I knew if I could not get on their level than I would never succeed with my lessons, no matter how elaborate they were.

            I learned a lot about myself not only as an educator but also as a person throughout this semester student-teaching.  Each day was a personal challenge to get these young adults motivated to learn, which not an easy task by any means is. However, for each failure I had there were two or three successes.  One of the proudest moments I had as student-teacher came in the very last week I was at the school.  I had given the class back to my mentor teacher and was finishing up my grading.  There was a sub-teacher in the classroom because my mentor teacher was sick at home.  I walked into the classroom and four or five students rushed my desk and begged me to teach the class that day.  They had expressed how they missed me and wished I was not leaving.  Inside I was both excited and extremely touched.  I had finally gotten my sense of accomplishment that I did get through to these young adults and affective their lives in a positive way.     

            The lesson that I will take from student-teaching that will forever stay with me is that while content and standards are important, the relationships I built within my classroom are much more meaningful.  I will have different classrooms and new students each year.  However, I will never forget the students of Marshall High School who helped me emerge as confident teacher who finally understood the reason for going into the educational world.  Not to say that I doubts but the thought of this being not for me definitely crept into my head during the first few days of student-teaching.  Now when someone rags on these young adults in our world today about being lazy and un-motivated, I will say “yes” but what are you doing to help them?  Every generation is going to be judged by the preceding one with critical accusations.  However, I am glad that I will be the one helping turn these young adults in to prosperous, intelligent adults who will have a profound impact on re-building our country.  So bittersweet is the word I choose to describe the experience I had because while it is sad that I am done, I can be confident that I did my best and will forever remember the Redhawks of Marshall High.

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